Tag Archives: textile art

Do You Remember Me?

Do You Remember Me? Book for sale here

 

I have just added a series of small studies for sale on my website.

Small Studies for sale here

More small studies for sale here

Small Mounted Studies for sale here

Small mounted studies for sale here 

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Retrospective • an archive of work 2011/12

 

image of 'some things never change'

Some Things Never Change 2012

Some Things Never Change 2012
Children of the First World War, the so-called ‘war to end war’ commemorate the plight of children worldwide.
Thousands of kisses on a concrete pillar will never be received.
Cut to 2012. A mother sobs. This is not her war.
Killed by mortar fire, her children were 12,10 and 5 years old.

Materials: Window cleaning linen, applied recycled shirting.
Technique: hand and machine stitch, acrylic paint, appliqué.

First shown at the Knitting & Stitching Shows 2012.

low-res-study-1.jpg

Homage to Nicholson 2012

7 Strands

Weekend in Barcelona 2011

From Grimsby to Gracia • right and David as Dali  • left were inspired by a recent visit to Barcelona, they reference cardboard cutouts of Dali seen outside the Dali Museum , the Gaudi mosaics and tiles in Parc Guell , a colourful tiled floor from a neighbourhood bar and fish from the artist’s hometown of Grimsby.

62 Group of Textile Artists 50th Anniversary Year

A Lot can Happen in 50 Years 2011

A Lot can Happen in Fifty Years • 2011 84 cms x 117 cms • hand and machine stitch

Referencing several items from the Manchester Museum’s costume Collection, including a button shaped like a fish, and a dress and jacket from 1962, the year the 62 group was formed this is a portrait of my sister, Jean, first aged 17, then aged 67.
The clock on the wall shows 2.05 am whilst the wrist watch is set at a later time to indicate the passing of time.
The side panels are made up from labels showing more items from the Collection .
They also reference personal, national and global events from the past 50 years .

image of Family with Fish

Family with Fish 2011

 

image of RIP Grimsby St E2

RIP Grimsby St E2

RIP Grimsby St E2
mixed media • hand and machine stitch with acrylic paint
size 70 x 100 cms

An analogy between two different eras and two different environments, which nonetheless share a name and a sense of loss. Three friends, one carrying a fish, explore one lost environment, Grimsby Street, London, E2 whilst hailing from another. 1930s Grimsby (Lincolnshire) girls meet London 2012.

 

Girl's Day Out for Hilda, Nellie and Ida

Girl’s Day Out for Hilda, Nellie and Ida

Girl’s Day Out in the East End for Hilda, Nellie and Ida 2012
mixed media • hand and machine stitch with acrylic paint
size 128 x 102 cms
Exploring displacement using old family photographs, images of distant relatives I never knew, cut into to a modern day environs, Girls Day Out enquires into and questions, the sense of belonging/not belonging whilst referencing the passing of time and the transience of life itself.

east end girls aka Alice, Madge and Muriel

East End Girls

East End Girls • aka Alice, Madge and Muriel 2012
mixed media • hand and machine stitch with acrylic paint
size 128 x 102 cms
Combining the then and now, evoking a sense of the journey in between produces an ‘at first glance’, homely domestic situation, three women with their dog. On closer inspection abandoned sofas, graffiti, the dilapidation in the slightly surreal composition create an allusion to the circumstance of the women portrayed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

63 - 16

63 – A Self-Portrait – Work in Progress

63 is a self-portrait which, when complete, will be made up of 63 images, one for each year of my life so far. So why put myself through all this work, and, to be perfectly honest, the angst of self examination, a replaying of all the ups and downs of life?
Well, there were several reasons, but the main one was that I was asked by Alf Ludlam, the curator of Shifting Images an exhibition of self-portraits at the Muriel Barker Gallery at Grimsby’s Fishing Heritage Centre, to produce something other than a straight forward self-portrait and this was the idea I came up with. I also thought it would benefit me personally because I would be working to a deadline which, in itself, would force me to look at the way I work and help me find a simplification of my mark-making.

63 - 2

63 work in progress 2

63 - 4

63 work in progress – 4

Although I work in mixed media I consider myself primarily an embroiderer, more specifically a hand embroiderer and because I find hand stitching a therapeutic process, I have a tendency to overstitch. I’m hoping that, in this piece, the viewer will find that my stitching have been given more breathing space and as a result more status. My stitch vocabulary is considered and limited. I don’t use many different types of stitches and but I try to get the most out of those stitches by using them in an original way. I was once given some advice by Constance Howard, when I was studying at Goldsmith’s College in London who said that “you don’t need to know a vast array of stitches but you need to know how use the ones you do know well” so that’s what I try to do.

63 - 7

63 work in progress -7

63 - 12

63 a work in progress – 12

I don’t really look at the work of other embroiderers in an inquisitorial way. This is deliberate, an attempt to keep my own work fresh. One of the ways I do this is by mixing different colours and different weights of threads in the needle leaving the eye to mix the colour. You can read about my favourite stitches  here.
I have deliberately tried to be sparing with my stitching of the faces in this piece to produce a more illustrative style. Mood, quality, expression, character can all be changed by the position of each stitch and a lot of drawing and re-drawing, stitching, unpicking and restitching has been done before moving on.

63 -25

63 a work in progress -25

63 -27

63 a work in progress – 27

I am a ‘glass half full’ sort of person but the process of making this piece has, so far, and I am only just over half way there, been an convergence of mixed emotion. The process has, at times, evoked difficult and even desperately unhappy emotions, the reliving of all that teenage angst, hurt, heartbreak, and loss, the business problems and burglaries, but alongside that the uplifting and happy memories of friends and family and an optimism for the future.

Overall it is proving to be a quite cathartic process.

63 - 32

63 a work in progress – 32

63 will be shown as a ‘work in progress’ in Shifting Images from 8 September 2015 to 6 March 2016. – contemporary self portraiture
Working in partnership with Abbey Walk Gallery the Muriel Barker Gallery at the Grimsby Fishing Heritage Centre will host an Exhibition of of self – portraiture by Lincolnshire Artists past and present.

Fred Harry and Madge Stone

Inspiration for Stitch – Part 4 – The Innocent Victims of War

The inspiration for my work can come from anywhere and everywhere and it sometimes takes on a more serious note. I turned on the radio and heard her voice and the words I will never forget “This is not my War”. They were the words spoken by a Syrian mother whose children aged 5,10 and 12 had just been killed by mortar fire in a war she did not understand. The sound of her voice will stay with me forever.

Some Things Never Change commemorates those children and the many others like them that have lost their lives, or have been mentally or physically scarred by war. The lives of those who have survived war and atrocity are changed for all time.
My Dad and his siblings Harry and Madge were children of the First World War, born just before and during so called ‘war to end war’. I have used their images to represent the universal child. The concrete pillar in the background is inspired by the concrete architecture of the skate park on the South Bank of the Thames and the graffiti of street artist Stik and is covered with cross stitches representing the kisses those Syrian children will never receive.

image of 'some things never change'

Some Things Never Change 2012

grafitti south bank 1
I listen to the Radio and hear his Voice again recalls something I heard on Radio 4. A 10 year old boy was talking to the reporter “You can’t imagine what I’ve seen, what my country has seen”. The Universal Child uses an image of my Dad to represent children affected by war worldwide.

image of the universal child

The Universal Child

image of I Listen to the Radio and hear his Voice

I Listen to the Radio and Hear his Voice.

The Unknown Statistic comes from my research into the First World War during the run up to the centenary in 2014 of the start of the war. A photograph is of some children, unknown to me, but in my husband’s family album was my starting point. I have had this image waiting to be used for many years but it was only when I saw the graffiti in the East End of London I knew how I was going to use it. The children have a poignancy to them. They look as though they are watching someone walking away. I decided to use their images as a way of commemorating all the children left fatherless by the First World War. The exact number of children is unknown as it was not recorded accurately either locally or nationally. I imagined their father was one of the brave Grimsby fishermen whose trawlers went minesweeping the coast with very little protection and little recognition. He walked away and never looked back. It was bad luck for a fisherman to turn around and look back as they walked away to sea. They never saw him again. My own Great Grandfather, Harry Conder died during the first few weeks of World War One when the trawler Fittonia, of which he was skipper, was blown up by a mine in the River Humber. He was survived by a widow and several children. His eldest son Charles Conder died during the last weeks of the war of Spanish Flu, the virus that would be responsible for more than five times as many deaths as the war itself.

image of kids from the family album

Kids from the Family album

east end graffiti

east end graffiti

image of the Unknown Statistic

The Unknown Statistic

Inspiration for Stitch – Part 2 – The East End of London

In this second post about my inspiration I take a look at the East End of London, and my love affair with the Grimsby Street area. The street is situated in E2 and shares its name with my hometown. In the early 2000s both my sons lived in London so I was a regular visitor. My younger son, Sam lived in Hackney at that time and had come across Grimsby Street E2 when visiting a friend nearby. The next time I visited he took me there and it was love at first sight.

Here are some of the images I fell in love with. They may seem strange. It’s quite rundown, but an art school education taught me to look and to see beauty in the smallest detail and to enjoy the ‘out of place’. When I look at these vistas I see my next piece of work.

The images above inspired pieces that depict the then, the now and the journey in-between. The first pieces I made were East End Chair and Closed pictured below.

East End Chair is a portrait of my Grandmother Annie Jane Smith sat in an abandoned armchair nursing a fish. My hometown of Grimsby is best known for its connection with the fishing industry and the fish represents the prosperity the fishing industry brought to the town.

Closed depicts the demise of the Grimsby fishing industry. The closed shop sign represents the end of the town’s prosperity after the Cod Wars in the 1950s and 60s.

This series made in 2012 combine 2 or more images to represent the passing of time and the transience of life. A Girls Day Out, East End Girls and RIP Grimsby St E2 version 1 & 2.

East End Girls combines an image of my grandmother, Alice Ann Stone, her daughter Madge and my Mum Muriel May Sone with an image of 2 abandoned east end sofas. It’s 128 cms wide x 104 cms high.

A Girl’s Day Out for Hilda, Nellie and Ida combines an image of 3 Grimsby sisters Hilda, Nellie and Ida with an image of Grimsby Street E2 graffiti by graffiti artist Stik.

RIP Grimsby Street E2 versions 1 & 2 chronicle the knocking down of part of Grimsby Street E2 in the run up to the 2012 London Olympics. An analogy between 2 different eras and 2 different environments .1930s Grimsby girls meet London 2012

The ever changing images of street art are fascinating. I have now been documenting the area for more than 10 years. Part 3 of the inspiration for Stitch posts will look at my documentation of the South Bank and more recent pieces inspired by the East End.