Tag Archives: sue stone archive

Girls in a Doorway

a new iPad drawing for work to be made in 2021.

Which Way Now? (below) aka A Self Portrait in Turmoil is perhaps an indication of my frame of mind during lockdown.

size:132 x 59 cms

mixed media

The Girls who made the Suits version 2 (below) is an experiment in texture and pattern

3 new self portraits (below) for the ongoing self portraits now numbering 67. 2 are replacements for portraits that have gone to new homes numbers 26 and 27 and a new one number 67.

Boxing Day with Grandad – iPad drawing – commission for Grimsby Fishing Heritage Centre GFHC in a Box project 2020

A Book Before Bedtime (below) was a commission for the Grimsby Fishing heritage Centre  – GFHC in a Box project supported by Arts council England

Made in 2020

Size: 54.5 x 40 cms

Materials: Acrylic gouache, pencil crayon, cotton and wool threads on cotton calico  

Techniques: Hand embroidery, painting 

A domestic scene from the 1950s when every night my Mum would read me a book at bedtime. We would sit on the settee with me ready for bed in my pyjamas. Our 1950s living room had heavy, dark utility furniture, a patterned carpet, patterned cushions, antimacassars on the settee, and faded patterned wallpaper with plaster ducks flying across the wall. Always a handbag, letters to post, and a favourite photo of my older sister on the side board and always a pair of shoes underneath the sideboard. The wireless set (radio) has a particular significance in capturing the atmosphere of the times. It was via the wireless that we would hear the news, both good and bad, of triumph and of loss. On the wall a picture of my Dad, Fred Stone working on the old pontoon on Grimsby docks in the 1950s with his brother, my Uncle Harry.

I am very proud of my Grimsby heritage and the close ties my family had with the Grimsby fishing industry in the 1950s is often reflected in the artwork I make. I was born in 1952 and as a child I spent a lot of time ‘down dock’ with my Dad, a Grimsby fish merchant. ‘Down Dock’ was a community within a community.

The passing on of knowledge has always been an important part of my artistic practice so when the chance to be involved with this project arose I was honoured to be able to take the opportunity to revisit my roots and make a piece of work for the Fishing Heritage Centre Collection and I welcome the chance for my work to reach a new audience through the loans boxes.

This Life Matters (below)

Work size w 190 cms x 35 cms

Portrait sizes 2 x 17 x 21 cms, 2 x 18.5 x 23.5 cms, 3 x 21 x 26 cms

Recycled linen clothing fabrics, cotton cambric, acrylic film, stranded cotton threads, cotton machine threads, industrial felt mat

Hand stitch, machine stitch, appliqué

‘This Life Matters’ is a series of 7 small portraits which focus on the inequality spotlighted by the Covid 19 pandemic. Each representative of the global community wears the same white t shirt with a slogan ‘This Life Matters’, a nod to Katherine Hamnett’s ‘Choose Life’ slogan t-shirts of the 1980s, Each has their own word embroidered at their side which indicates their circumstances or mindset: Displaced, disenfranchised, disconsolate, dispossessed, dispirited, disabled, and lastly disappearing. Each life is as important as the next. 

A series of new teaching samples (Below) made in 2020

Narrative, Strip Weaving & Portrait – hand stitch & mixed media

Portrait of Anne Morrell (below)

hand stitch 26 x 30 cms

A commissioned work to accompany the article Roots in Two continents by Brinda Gill for Issue 95 (July /August) of Selvedge magazine

Brooklyn: Recollection, Return and Repartee (below)

Completed January 2020

Materials: linen & cotton fabrics, cotton & linen threads, acrylic paint

Size 100 x 77 x 2 cms

Techniques: hand stitch, machine stitch, appliqué, painting

Part of a series of work called From Grimsby* to Greenpoint & Beyond this piece Brooklyn: Recollection, Return, and Repartee recounts the artist’s memories of return visit to Brooklyn in March 2019. The viewer is taken on a journey during which flashbacks and glimpses of everyday life, are encapsulated in the ‘mind’s eye’ of the artist; attempting to capture of the essence of a specific New York borough and recalling the brogue of Brooklyn in the form of sights, experiences and written word. 

Meandering lines plot our paths and the conversations twist and turn; from small talk on the subway to bantering with tall statues in Banker St, taking in gibberish and graffiti in Greenpoint, a powwow at Prospect Park, books at the Brooklyn public library and the buzz of Brooklyn Museum on the way. 

The references in this piece include a homage to the street artist ESPO aka Stephen Powers & artist Deborah Kass 

*Grimsby is the artist’s hometown in the UK.

Retrospective – an Archive of work from 2007/8

Past Forward 2008
This exhibition was the result of seven artists and a composer working with the art of the past.
Each one chose a particular artist and made studies from their work, in the form of drawings, sketches and paintings. The knowledge gained from this analysis was used to make more personal pieces. The artist I studied was Grant Wood.
Grant Wood (1891-1942)
Best  known for his famous canvas American Gothic (1930)  American artist Grant Wood was born and raised in Iowa in America’s rural heartland .
Grant Wood founded his art on his heritage and pioneered a new vision of Regionalist Art.After a trip to Europe in 1928 he started to experiment with some artistic elements adapted from the old Flemish masters using their decorative patterning and solid contoured painting in his subsequent work.
I first became interested in Grant Wood’s paintings a few years ago when I used a transcription of American Gothic  for a series of 5 self portraits so I decided to take a closer look at his lesser known work.
Woman with Plants is an unsentimental portrait of the artist’s mother depicting her as an archetypal pioneer woman with a rather lush farmscape in the background . This was Wood’s first serious attempt at a neo-Flemish painting In my version Woman with Fish  instead of Grant Wood’s mother I have depicted my maternal grandmother Annie Jane Smith and have replaced the Iowa landscape with a Lincolnshire landscape (Tetney Lock to be more specific) The plants have become fish and Wood’s signature windmill is now the Grimsby Dock Tower.

woman with fish

woman with fish 2007

Daughters of Revolution  Depicting them as shortsighted spinsters whom he called ‘ those Tory Gals ‘this satyrical painting was executed as a revenge on the local members of the DAR after they publicly criticised a piece of his work for being assembled abroad. In my version Daughters of Grim (above right) I have replaced the stern faced DAR women with my maternal grandmother Annie Jane Smith and my paternal grandmother Alice Ann Stone on the left of the picture and my mother Muriel May Stone  on the right. The painting in the background depicts the brave fishermen of the Grand Fleet Grimsby c 1920. and I have replaced the teacup with a small fish .

Daughters of Grim 2008

Daughters of Grim 2008

Art of the Stitch 2008/9
March 2008 – November 2009 – I had 2 pieces selected from 944 entries of which 56 were chosen to be shown . Biennial Exhibition presented by the Embroiderer’s Guild in association with Coat’s Crafts.
International Tour :Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery,UK, Deutsches Textilmuseum, Krefeld, Germany, Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest, Hungary, Knitting & Stitching shows, London & Harrogate 2009
East End Chair 2007 (left) Woman with a Fish 2007 (right)

East End Chair

East End Chair

Woman with a Fish '07

Woman with a Fish ’07

A selection of beach and landscapes 2007/8

tetney-vista

Tetney Vista

sand-dunes-humberston

Humberstone Fences

humberston

Humberstone

humberston-foreshore

Humberstone Foreshore

Tetney Lock

Tetney Lock

Humberstone Beach

Humberston Beach

Retrospective • an Archive of Work 2017

Retrospective • an Archive of work 2016

Retrospective • An Archive of work from 2015

Retrospective • An Archive of work from 2013/14

Retrospective • An Archive of work from 2011/12

Retrospective • An Archive of work from 2009/10

Retrospective • An Archive of work from 2007/8

Retrospective • An Archive of work from 2003 to 2006