Tag Archives: Grimsby

Inspiration for Stitch – Part 2 – The East End of London

In this second post about my inspiration I take a look at the East End of London, and my love affair with the Grimsby Street area. The street is situated in E2 and shares its name with my hometown. In the early 2000s both my sons lived in London so I was a regular visitor. My younger son, Sam lived in Hackney at that time and had come across Grimsby Street E2 when visiting a friend nearby. The next time I visited he took me there and it was love at first sight.

Here are some of the images I fell in love with. They may seem strange. It’s quite rundown, but an art school education taught me to look and to see beauty in the smallest detail and to enjoy the ‘out of place’. When I look at these vistas I see my next piece of work.

The images above inspired pieces that depict the then, the now and the journey in-between. The first pieces I made were East End Chair and Closed pictured below.

East End Chair is a portrait of my Grandmother Annie Jane Smith sat in an abandoned armchair nursing a fish. My hometown of Grimsby is best known for its connection with the fishing industry and the fish represents the prosperity the fishing industry brought to the town.

Closed depicts the demise of the Grimsby fishing industry. The closed shop sign represents the end of the town’s prosperity after the Cod Wars in the 1950s and 60s.

This series made in 2012 combine 2 or more images to represent the passing of time and the transience of life. A Girls Day Out, East End Girls and RIP Grimsby St E2 version 1 & 2.

East End Girls combines an image of my grandmother, Alice Ann Stone, her daughter Madge and my Mum Muriel May Sone with an image of 2 abandoned east end sofas. It’s 128 cms wide x 104 cms high.

A Girl’s Day Out for Hilda, Nellie and Ida combines an image of 3 Grimsby sisters Hilda, Nellie and Ida with an image of Grimsby Street E2 graffiti by graffiti artist Stik.

RIP Grimsby Street E2 versions 1 & 2 chronicle the knocking down of part of Grimsby Street E2 in the run up to the 2012 London Olympics. An analogy between 2 different eras and 2 different environments .1930s Grimsby girls meet London 2012

The ever changing images of street art are fascinating. I have now been documenting the area for more than 10 years. Part 3 of the inspiration for Stitch posts will look at my documentation of the South Bank and more recent pieces inspired by the East End.

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Ebb & Flow • Behind the Scenes

image of Portrait of a Grimsby Girl

Portrait of a Grimsby Girl

The opening of the 62 Group Ebb & Flow exhibition is getting closer but the project itself has been almost two years in the planning. 

It started with an invitation from Grimsby Minster to show our work in the Minster which is a busy and vibrant resource for the people of North East Lincolnshire, an “architectural gem” tracing its history on this site for more than 900 years. I soon realised, however, that because we are such a large group of very diverse artists that there would not be enough suitable hanging space and display for smaller 3D work in the Minster for all of our work to be shown.

A second venue was sort and we were offered the upper floor, the mezzanine, of the Muriel Barker Gallery at the Fishing Heritage Centre in Grimsby. The Grimsby Fishing Heritage Centre was purpose built and opened in 1991. Its permanent exhibition tells the story of the Grimsby Fishing Industry in its heyday in the1950s. The white-walled space at the Fishing Heritage Centre contrasts nicely with the grandeur of the Minster.

image of All at Sea

Lucy Brown
All at Sea

The Ross Tiger, GY398, is an ex-working 1950’s trawler and the largest item in the heritage collections. Lucy Brown, one of our exhibiting members has made site specific work to be shown on board the Tiger. The image left shows Lucy’s ‘sea bags’ which will be installed around the living quarters on the Tiger. Once the venues were in place we worked on the detail of the project and funding bid to Arts Council England by Grimsby Minster which was successful. This enabled us to work with freelance writer and curator, June Hill who has been on hand to advise the group throughout the project and who will be opening the exhibition on 13th September. It also helped the group to put together a full education programme and to produce a full colour catalogue with professional photography which will be on sale at both venues.

Details of our education programme can be found here. Many of our members visited Grimsby in February when we were given a tour of both venues and of the museum collections store. All of our exhibitions are selected by a selection panel of 5. The panel is different for each exhibition and can include a representative from the venue. The selection process has now been completed and 37 pieces of work were selected for the exhibition made by 28 artists.

Photography

Photography Day at the Minster

This week we also completed the photography for the catalogue which is now in the design stages. The catalogue will be on sale at both venues.

The photographer for the majority of the pieces is David Ramkalawon who came to Grimsby from London for 2 days to photograph work at both venues.

The snap left shows David photographing work in Grimsby Minster. 

Next week the hanging process begins. Watch this space for more ‘behind the scenes’ glimpses of Ebb & Flow.

10 Things to be Proud of

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Our hometowns and familiar environments can be taken for granted and I have to confess that I am guilty of doing this to a certain extent. Something happened just recently to make me look at my own hometown, Grimsby, N E Lincolnshire, UK  through fresh eyes. So what was it that made me do this? Well, the 62 Group of Textile Artists came to town for a Members’ Research Day.

Later in the year the group, of which I am the current chair, are having an exhibition in the town which will run concurrently at two very different venues, the first, Grimsby Minster is an “architectural gem” tracing its history on this site for more than 900 years. The second venue is the Muriel Barker gallery at the purpose built Fishing Heritage centre which opened in 1991.

I decided to try and find 10 things about my hometown which would fill me with pride. The town was once the largest and busiest fishing port in the world and was known as the ‘Klondyke of the East  Coast’ and in the 1980s it was also known as ‘Food Town, Europe so the obvious place to start was with food so here goes.

1. Grimsby Traditional Smoked  Haddock.

In 2009 Grimsby Traditional Smoked Fish was awarded a Protected Geographical Indication from the European Union. This means that only fish produced in Grimsby using the traditional method can be called Grimsby Traditional Smoked Fish.

Find out more : http://gtfsgroup.co.uk/

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2. Grimsby Fish Market

Grimsby is of course famous for it’s fish, Grimsby Fish Market is the focal point of the local industry and its importance is recognised by the UK and EU Fishing Industries.

Find out more : http://www.grimsbyfishmarket.co.uk/

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3. Local Fish & Chips

When I was a child we ate fresh fish 2 or 3 times a week . Fish so fresh it still tasted of the sea. Today the Captain’s Table fish restaurant in Cleethorpes serves sustainable fish which tastes just as fresh. In my opinion better the Magpie café in Whitby and I’ve tried both.

Find out more : http://www.thecaptainstable.co/

4. Lincolnshire Sausages

The John Pettit’s butchers has been making sausages for over 100 years. Their Lincolnshire sausage, is  still made to an original family recipe dating back to 1810.

Find out more: http://www.johnpettitbutchers.co.uk/category/sausages

5. Grimsby Minster

Grimsby Minster is known for being the only parish church in England to have its own Choir School, St James’ School. The building has been changing and evolving over many centuries.

Find out more: http://grimsbyminster.com/

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6. The Fishing Heritage Centre.

Opened in 1991 the FHC has a permanent exhibition depicting the Grimsby deep sea fishing industry in its heyday of the 1950s. It also has a temporary exhibition space. Over the last 5 years it has housed the ‘Unlocking the Collection’ series of exhibitions. The current one ‘ Treasures from the Collection runs until 21st April 2014.

Find out more : https://www.facebook.com/FishingHeritageCentreGrimsby

7. The Museum Collection of N E Lincolnshire

For about 10 years I volunteered to work with the fantastic costume collection.The collection represents the history of North East Lincolnshire, from its geological origins to the modern day. It currently consists of approximately 60,000 artefacts across Archaeology, Natural Sciences, Local and Social History, Costume, Art and Maritime History.

Find out more : N E Lincs Museum Collection

8. The Great Grimsby Ice Factory

This grade 2* listed building was was built in 1901. Its purpose was to supply ice to preserve fish on its journey from the deep sea fishing grounds to the nation’s plates. It closed its doors in 1990. The Great Grimsby Ice Factory trust are fighting to save this fantastic building.

Find out more : http://ggift.co.uk/

To help to save this important building donate : http://ggift.co.uk/make-a-donation/

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9. The Dock Tower

For 137 years Grimsby Dock Tower has dominated the town’s skyline and is a well known landmark. The 309ft high tower has played a fascinating role in the town’s industrial history.

Find out more :  Dock Tower

10. Cleethorpes

Most of my life, apart from a brief sojourn in London, I have lived within 6 miles of the East Coast of England. Its huge skies and vast beaches are second to none. Cleethorpes developed as a fishing village but with the coming of the railways in 1863 it soon became a popular seaside resort. The town adjoins my hometown of Grimsby.

Find out more : Cleethorpes history and heritage

Now I have taken a fresh look at my hometown and surrounding area why don’t you do the same. It’s amazing what you’ll see.

Anna Scott : I am inspired…

Anna Scott who is an Australian embroiderer and blogger has kindly posted about my work.

Anna Scott : I am inspired….

It was so refreshing to get an email from Anna asking if she could use my images for her blog. Usually people just help themselves nowadays. I don’t really mind this on the whole as the images are usually used by students as reference material. Reproduction for financial gain would be another thing but images of my work can be found all over the internet and I like to share. She asked me why I use the image of a fish so often. It ‘s quite simple really. My hometown is Grimsby in Lincolnshire in the UK. Grimsby was once the largest and the busiest fishing port in the world and was known as the ‘ Klondyke of the East Coast of England’. Sadly this is no longer true, the northern cod wars with Iceland put paid to that and the place has gone to rack and ruin. Actually there are quite a few of my pieces that are about this very thing with references to a Grimsby St in London which has been knocked about somewhat in recent years. My family was very involved in the fishing industry both as fishermen and fish merchants so the fish has become my signature if you like, a symbol of where I’m from and I usually try to include on somewhere on my major pieces. The image below shows the first work in which I included a fish.

Public voting for the craft&design selected awards 2014 is now open

To vote for me please go to at the bottom of my makers page  http://www.craftmaker.co.uk/suestone/

image of Woman with a Fish 2007

Woman with a Fish 2007

The Last Picture Show

detail 5 outside the pub

The Last Picture Show will sadly be the last exhibition at Gate Gallery which closes its doors for good on 21 December 2013. It runs from 5 December until 21 December 2013 and is a mixed show by gallery artists including Sue Stone, Sarah Webb, Nick Ellerby, Steve Upton, Wayne Sleeth, Alf Ludlam, Anthony Housman and Letitia Thompson. The gallery will close after six and a half years of wonderful exhibitions. I have been showing my work there since it opened in April 2007 and was one of 3 artists in the inaugural exhibition. It will be missed.

Tea Party in Tokyo

A Tea Party in Tokyo version 2

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images of paintings by Steve Upton (left) and Alf Ludlam (centre and right)

Grimsby’s “magnificent” Ice Factory

My hometown Grimsby was featured on the Food Programme on Radio 4 on Sunday Sheila Dillon extolled the virtues of Grimsby Traditional cold smoked haddock and the the wonderful building that is the Great grimsby Ice Factory. Here’s a quote from what she said

“Grimsby Docks are extraordinary. If you want to know about Britain at the height of it’s imperial power, come to Grimsby Docks. Over there is the Ice House (Ice Factory), I mean it’s a palace, it’s a red brick palace with porticos and grand arches around the windows and it used to produce hundreds, thousands of tons of ice for one of the greatest ports in Europe. Now the windows are smashed, I don’t know whether any part of it is still in production. It certainly doesn’t look like it, it looks as though they bring in the ice from outside. But it’s the grandest building and it shows you what Grimsby used to be and in a way it shows you what the traditional fish smokers actually want to revive about this place, it’s magnificent.”

The image below shows Sheila Dillon with Richard Enderby of Alfred Enderby Ltd , traditional Grimsby fish smokers.

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Alice Fox • Tide Marks

Earlier this week I had the privilege of helping to hang Alice Fox’s solo exhibition ‘Tide Marks’ at Gate Gallery, Grimsby. This exciting exhibition runs from 24 October to 30 November 2013. If you can’t wait for my full review of the exhibition for the Textileartist website, you can find more information about the show here.

Here are a few images from the show to wet your appetite. All images courtesy of Alice Fox.

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