Tag Archives: grimsby minster

Ebb & Flow • Behind the Scenes

image of Portrait of a Grimsby Girl

Portrait of a Grimsby Girl

The opening of the 62 Group Ebb & Flow exhibition is getting closer but the project itself has been almost two years in the planning. 

It started with an invitation from Grimsby Minster to show our work in the Minster which is a busy and vibrant resource for the people of North East Lincolnshire, an “architectural gem” tracing its history on this site for more than 900 years. I soon realised, however, that because we are such a large group of very diverse artists that there would not be enough suitable hanging space and display for smaller 3D work in the Minster for all of our work to be shown.

A second venue was sort and we were offered the upper floor, the mezzanine, of the Muriel Barker Gallery at the Fishing Heritage Centre in Grimsby. The Grimsby Fishing Heritage Centre was purpose built and opened in 1991. Its permanent exhibition tells the story of the Grimsby Fishing Industry in its heyday in the1950s. The white-walled space at the Fishing Heritage Centre contrasts nicely with the grandeur of the Minster.

image of All at Sea

Lucy Brown
All at Sea

The Ross Tiger, GY398, is an ex-working 1950’s trawler and the largest item in the heritage collections. Lucy Brown, one of our exhibiting members has made site specific work to be shown on board the Tiger. The image left shows Lucy’s ‘sea bags’ which will be installed around the living quarters on the Tiger. Once the venues were in place we worked on the detail of the project and funding bid to Arts Council England by Grimsby Minster which was successful. This enabled us to work with freelance writer and curator, June Hill who has been on hand to advise the group throughout the project and who will be opening the exhibition on 13th September. It also helped the group to put together a full education programme and to produce a full colour catalogue with professional photography which will be on sale at both venues.

Details of our education programme can be found here. Many of our members visited Grimsby in February when we were given a tour of both venues and of the museum collections store. All of our exhibitions are selected by a selection panel of 5. The panel is different for each exhibition and can include a representative from the venue. The selection process has now been completed and 37 pieces of work were selected for the exhibition made by 28 artists.

Photography

Photography Day at the Minster

This week we also completed the photography for the catalogue which is now in the design stages. The catalogue will be on sale at both venues.

The photographer for the majority of the pieces is David Ramkalawon who came to Grimsby from London for 2 days to photograph work at both venues.

The snap left shows David photographing work in Grimsby Minster. 

Next week the hanging process begins. Watch this space for more ‘behind the scenes’ glimpses of Ebb & Flow.

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10 Things to be Proud of

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Our hometowns and familiar environments can be taken for granted and I have to confess that I am guilty of doing this to a certain extent. Something happened just recently to make me look at my own hometown, Grimsby, N E Lincolnshire, UK  through fresh eyes. So what was it that made me do this? Well, the 62 Group of Textile Artists came to town for a Members’ Research Day.

Later in the year the group, of which I am the current chair, are having an exhibition in the town which will run concurrently at two very different venues, the first, Grimsby Minster is an “architectural gem” tracing its history on this site for more than 900 years. The second venue is the Muriel Barker gallery at the purpose built Fishing Heritage centre which opened in 1991.

I decided to try and find 10 things about my hometown which would fill me with pride. The town was once the largest and busiest fishing port in the world and was known as the ‘Klondyke of the East  Coast’ and in the 1980s it was also known as ‘Food Town, Europe so the obvious place to start was with food so here goes.

1. Grimsby Traditional Smoked  Haddock.

In 2009 Grimsby Traditional Smoked Fish was awarded a Protected Geographical Indication from the European Union. This means that only fish produced in Grimsby using the traditional method can be called Grimsby Traditional Smoked Fish.

Find out more : http://gtfsgroup.co.uk/

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2. Grimsby Fish Market

Grimsby is of course famous for it’s fish, Grimsby Fish Market is the focal point of the local industry and its importance is recognised by the UK and EU Fishing Industries.

Find out more : http://www.grimsbyfishmarket.co.uk/

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3. Local Fish & Chips

When I was a child we ate fresh fish 2 or 3 times a week . Fish so fresh it still tasted of the sea. Today the Captain’s Table fish restaurant in Cleethorpes serves sustainable fish which tastes just as fresh. In my opinion better the Magpie café in Whitby and I’ve tried both.

Find out more : http://www.thecaptainstable.co/

4. Lincolnshire Sausages

The John Pettit’s butchers has been making sausages for over 100 years. Their Lincolnshire sausage, is  still made to an original family recipe dating back to 1810.

Find out more: http://www.johnpettitbutchers.co.uk/category/sausages

5. Grimsby Minster

Grimsby Minster is known for being the only parish church in England to have its own Choir School, St James’ School. The building has been changing and evolving over many centuries.

Find out more: http://grimsbyminster.com/

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6. The Fishing Heritage Centre.

Opened in 1991 the FHC has a permanent exhibition depicting the Grimsby deep sea fishing industry in its heyday of the 1950s. It also has a temporary exhibition space. Over the last 5 years it has housed the ‘Unlocking the Collection’ series of exhibitions. The current one ‘ Treasures from the Collection runs until 21st April 2014.

Find out more : https://www.facebook.com/FishingHeritageCentreGrimsby

7. The Museum Collection of N E Lincolnshire

For about 10 years I volunteered to work with the fantastic costume collection.The collection represents the history of North East Lincolnshire, from its geological origins to the modern day. It currently consists of approximately 60,000 artefacts across Archaeology, Natural Sciences, Local and Social History, Costume, Art and Maritime History.

Find out more : N E Lincs Museum Collection

8. The Great Grimsby Ice Factory

This grade 2* listed building was was built in 1901. Its purpose was to supply ice to preserve fish on its journey from the deep sea fishing grounds to the nation’s plates. It closed its doors in 1990. The Great Grimsby Ice Factory trust are fighting to save this fantastic building.

Find out more : http://ggift.co.uk/

To help to save this important building donate : http://ggift.co.uk/make-a-donation/

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9. The Dock Tower

For 137 years Grimsby Dock Tower has dominated the town’s skyline and is a well known landmark. The 309ft high tower has played a fascinating role in the town’s industrial history.

Find out more :  Dock Tower

10. Cleethorpes

Most of my life, apart from a brief sojourn in London, I have lived within 6 miles of the East Coast of England. Its huge skies and vast beaches are second to none. Cleethorpes developed as a fishing village but with the coming of the railways in 1863 it soon became a popular seaside resort. The town adjoins my hometown of Grimsby.

Find out more : Cleethorpes history and heritage

Now I have taken a fresh look at my hometown and surrounding area why don’t you do the same. It’s amazing what you’ll see.

7 Strands Symposium • What happened on the Day

 Tuesday, 12 July 2011 saw the first 7 Strands Textile Symposium take place in the historic surroundings of Grimsby Minster. This was the first event of this kind I have organised and  participants traveled from as far and wide as Hastings, Heckmondwike, Hull, York and Lincoln to take part in the one day event.
During the morning International textile artist Tilleke Schwarz delivered a workshop entitled ‘Telling your own story’ . Everybody made a collage about their interests, likes, dislikes and life in general and then Tilleke invited them all to tell the others about their work. It was a great ice-breaker and some interesting tales were revealed.

 Then, after a break for coffee and delicious home baked cakes and scones courtesy of the Minster coffee shop which I can thoroughly recommend , it was time to practice Tilleke’s favourite stitch which is couching.
Couching is often overlooked in favour of more complicated techniques so it was fascinating to be reminded of the versatility of such a simple stitch. I have used the technique myself with difficult threads such as recycled stranded rope as well as finer threads to create varied results. Tilleke uses it for drawing and also for text .The couching threads may be either the same color as the laid threads or a contrasting color. When couching threads contrast with laid threads, patterns may also be worked in the couching stitches.
The feedback I received indicated that the workshop was thoroughly enjoyed. For me it was great to see simple activities like collage and hand stitched couching with fresh eyes. A real inspiration and I will definitely be using those techniques myself in the future.

The afternoon started with a talk by Lucy Brown , a conceptual artist from Brighton. Lucy practice is a complete contrast to Tilleke’s so the different styles gave some insight into the breadth of contemporary textiles in the 21st century. Lucy uses vintage and second hand, mainly women’s, clothing as the raw materials for her work and it was fascinating for me to hear about how she collects and stores these items in her studio as well as seeing the finished pieces of work. Her talk ‘Other People’s Clothes’  discussed the works presented in Seven Strands exhibition in context with her wider practice. The materials and the process alongside narratives around femaleness, re-invention and body absence and presence were also covered .http://www.axisweb.org/seCVPG.aspx?ARTISTID=5805

The final part of the afternoon session was an illustrated lecture by Tilleke Schwarz  ‘Making Sense out of the Non Sense’ . http://www.tillekeschwarz.com/ The lecture covered not only her own work but that of others that she finds inspiring . I was particularly interested to find out that she enjoys the work of Michael Raedecker , an artist I greatly admire myself .http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/michael_raedecker_about.htm
All in all I think the event was enjoyed by all who attended.

7 STRANDS TEXTILE SYMPOSIUM

Well it’s been a mad couple of weeks getting ready for the Rijswijk Textile Bienniel in the Netherlands. Making sure my work was all prepared,frames retouched and then getting the work packed. Making the boxes was an event of its own! Cutting,taping, joining 2 together for the big pieces and then getting it sent to the Rijswijk Museum in the Netherlands. It arrived in 2 days. Good old DHL Express,fantastic service. 
In amongst all that I found out I had been successful with my Arts Council bid for the 7 Strands at the Minster Textile Symposium and Exhibition so then it was all hell let loose.
Leaflets to be prepared , the website to update, site visits, etc,etc. I feel like I have had no sleep for the last fortnight. Still it will be worth it when it all comes together. 
For more information about the Symposium and Exhibition please visit : 7 Strands
The tickets will be available to buy online from Sue Stone or at Gate Gallery by 26 May 2011.
Please book early to secure your place as tickets are strictly limited.
It’s a real privilege to bring artists of this calibre to my hometown. The Textile Symposium will be a first for Grimsby and we deserve to see the work of National and International artists in this area.The artists Helen Banzhaf , Lucy Brown, Dorothy Ann Daly, Ann Goddard, Christine Gornowicz , Tilleke Schwarz and myself, are all members of the 62 group of textile artists. This event must surely encourage a wider audience and a greater appreciation of Textiles as an art form.

image • Tilleke Schwarz • Fisk (detail) 2010
Our work can be seen in 2 exhibitions:
7 Strands • 2 June to 23 July at Gate Gallery, 12, Brighowgate, Grimsby, DN32 0RA


7 Strands at the Minster • 16 June to 17 July at Grimsby Minster, St James Square, Grimsby
International Textile Artist, Tilleke Schwarz ( Netherlands) and Brighton based Textile Artist, Lucy Brown will be visiting the town on 12 July. Tilleke will give a half day workshop entitled : Telling your own Story and an illustrated lecture; Making sense out of non sense ,at the Symposium. Lucy Brown, who uses vintage and second hand clothing as the raw materials for her practice,will be giving a talk called : Other Peoples Clothes.
I am really looking forward to meeting as many of you as possible at the event.