Tag Archives: grafitti

Bushwick, Brooklyn - photo by Yeshen Venema

From Grimsby to Greenpoint and Beyond

‘From Grimsby to Greenpoint and Beyond’ has been selected for the 62 Group exhibition ‘Ctrl/Shift’ which will open at MAC, Birmingham on 21 July and runs until 9 September. The piece is made up of 9 sections measures 175  x 123 cms when assembled.
Materials :Linen/recycled clothing fabrics,cotton threads, InkTense pencils,acrylic paint
Techniques: Hand and machine stitch.appliqué, piecing, drawing, painting

Details of ‘From Grimsby to Greenpoint & Beyond’ photos by Yeshen Venema

Sue Stone 15Sue Stone 21Sue Stone 2Sue Stone 5Sue Stone 14Sue Stone 16Sue Stone 25
A visit to Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York sparked the idea for this work in which the emphasis shifts slightly away from people, and towards place, a specific place, New York and a snapshot of a specific time period 21/12/16 to 3/01/17. Another small shift is in the use of materials, black thread was used abundantly in this piece this is a new departure as was the use of Derwent InkTense pencils to draw and colour the background fabric.
A new approach, an attempt to capture a new energy in the work and a move away from control in the design process meant the work evolved and has had several incarnations during the making process rather than being pre-planned.
There are a multitude of references in this work; to the atmosphere and fast pace of New York City to the areas and places visited and to great beer, coffee and food consumed. Also referenced are a selection of the many street artists in Greenpoint and Bushwick including Faille, a Brooklyn-based artistic collaboration between Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller and there’s tribute paid to particular artworks, ‘Jawbone of an Ass’ by Jean-Michel Basquiat and ‘The Mermaid’ a sculpture by Liz Craft at the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan.

Advertisements

Paint • Stitch • in progress 2

In the early morning listening to Radio 4 the news all seems to be bad. My most recent piece is called Some things never change. The need to make this work was triggered by an interview with a mother telling the reporter of the fate of her children aged 12,10 and 5 , killed by mortar fire in a war that was not hers. As a mother myself the interview deeply affected me. I have never been a particularly political person but I feel the need to speak out, in my own way, about the victims of these senseless conflicts. Born in 1913 my Dad was a child of the 1st World war, the so called the war to end war and I have used his image, along that of his siblings, as a mechanism to portray the plight of children still caught up in war in 2012. Thousands of kisses cover a concrete pillar for those who will never receive them. The images are of the work in progress.